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Computer Operating Systems

An Operating System, or OS, is a software program that enables the computer hardware to communicate and operate with the computer software. Without a computer Operating System, a computer is useless. Computer operating systems have progressed throughout the years thanks to new and improved technology. There are many different categories of computer operating systems. The first is the Graphical User Interface, or GUI. A GUI Operating System contains graphics and icons and is commonly navigated by using a computer mouse. Some examples of a GUI system would be Windows 98 and Windows CE. The next type of Computer Operating System is the Multiprocessing, it is An operating system capable of supporting and utilizing more than one computer processor. Linux and Unix are Multiprocessing operating systems.

The last two computer operating systems we are going to discuss are the Multitasking and the Multithreading operation systems. The Multitasking operating system is an Operating system that is capable of allowing multiple software processes to run at the same time. Windows 2000 is a multitasking operating system. The Multithreading operating system allows different parts of a software program to run concurrently, such as Unix. The choice of your specific operating system may depend on the hardware architecture of your computer. Modern operating systems usually have a GUI. Older models and Operating Systems not designed for direct-human interaction, such as web-servers, they generally use a Command line interface, or CLI, typically with only the keyboard for input rather than including the mouse. Regardless of which of the computer operating systems you decide to go with, you need to make sure that you are able to navigate your way around the operating system. If you aren't typically a computer friendly person you need to set aside specific time to study your operating system in order to maintain its proper functioning.